Article14 September 2018Reading time about 3 minutes

We may be biased, but what a launch!

ING's behavioural expertise highlighted

The Behavioural Economics guide is affectionately known as the 'bible' for anyone with even a passing interest in consumer economics. And given that ING is committed to helping people make better financial decisions through sites such as eZonomics and the Think Forward Initiative, it was fitting we hosted the book's launch in London. 

If you've not come across it before, the guide draws in contributions from ten industry contributors and universities; it showcases how organisations are bridging the gap between behavioural science theory and application. As shared by its founder, Alain Samson, this annual publication is continuing to grow, with translations in Portuguese, Spanish, French, German and Arabic this year.

Inspirational ideas

A full house heard from our leading speaker, Gerd Gigerenzer, an award-winning author and director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Gerd shed light on the impact that our quick thoughts have on our day to day decisions. His inspirational talk made us realise that we need to rely on both data and rules of thumb when making tough decisions.

Concepts from the Guide were then explored and discussed by ING’s Jessica Exton and Laura Straeter, Henry Stott from Decision Technology and Steve Martin from Influence at Work, before ongoing discussion and debate. Many continued the discussions at venues nearby, a true testament to the enthusiasm and engagement of our behavioural science audience. 

Download the guide

Now in its fifth year, The Behavioural Economics Guide essential reading for those in the behavioural science community and ING is thrilled to be associated with such a prestigious title. You can download it free here. The latest guide features contributions from five continents and an introduction by Robert Cialdini, author of ‘Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion’ and a guest editorial by renowned economist, Robert Metcalfe.